What are the short-term risks of taking LSD?

What are the short-term risks of taking LSD?

What are the short-term risks of taking LSD?

The most common dangers of LSD result from bad trips, including terrifying thoughts and feelings, despair, fear of losing control, and fear of death. These problems are especially common and severe in people with underlying mental problems like severe depression, schizophrenia, or bipolar disease. Some fatal accidents have also occurred among users who could not perceive the reality of their situation. They hallucinate safe situations when they are actually in danger or are unable to judge distances. You should never operate machinery or drive cars while taking LSD.

Problems that might occur include:

  • Extreme changes in behavior and mood; person may sit or recline in a trance-like state
  • Chills, irregular breathing, sweating, trembling hands
  • Changes in sense of light, hearing, touch, smell, and time
  • Nausea, especially in the first two hours
  • Increase in blood pressure, heart rate and blood sugar
  • Fatigue the next day

Are there long-term consequences to taking LSD?

Hallucinogens can cause extreme, long-lasting adverse neuropsychiatric effects, like flashbacks (post-hallucination perceptual disorders), relatively long-lasting psychoses, severe depression or shizophrenia-like syndromes, especially in heavy or long-term users or in people with an underlying mental illness.

Some of the long-term problems associated with chronic or heavy LSD use are:

  • A person can experience rapidly changing feelings, immediately and long after use.
  • Chronic use may cause persistent problems, depression, violent behavior, anxiety or a distorted perception of time.
  • Large doses may cause convulsions, coma, heart/lung failure or ruptured blood vessels in the brain.
  • “Flashbacks” may occur long after use.

Is there any way to reduce the risk of having a bad trip?

LSD experiences are heavily influenced by environment.

Here are some ways to reduce the risk having a bad trip:

  • Make sure you take it with someone you know and trust, preferably someone who knows how strong the effects of a hallucinogen can be.
  • Make sure you are somewhere where you feel safe, secure and comfortable.
  • Avoid taking LSD if you are upset, feeling low or insecure–this could lead to a bad trip.
  • Avoid taking more. The effects come on stronger after a while, and you could end up having a much stronger trip than you can handle.

If you’re having a bad time, avoid flashing lights and visuals and get a friend to take you to a safe, calm space

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